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Newsletter January 2022

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Grayshott Gardeners Newsletter

January 2022

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members

In wishing you a happy and safe New Year, I hope you managed to take advantage of the unexpected warm weather in December, as I did, to catch up with those last jobs in the garden before the real winter starts.

Looking forward to 2022, Sue has produced another series of varied and quality lectures which we hope will be live. However, if events turn against us, be confident we will be ready to Zoom if necessary.

The trial of making a video of John Baker’s fascinating lecture on ‘The Gardens of Japan’ went off successfully. We had over 30 viewings on YouTube, which I hope enabled members who were unable to attend not to miss out.

If you enjoy looking at gardens around Hampshire and Surrey, would you be interested in planning a few trips for the club during the summer? This is not a committee role, but it would mean discussing the visits with the owners and setting up dates for us to visit as a group, where we would make our own travel arrangements. If you are interested in finding out more, please contact me or a member of the committee.

Best wishes. John

NEW YEAR’S DAY FLOWER COUNT

We thought it might be fun to start 2022 with a Grayshott Gardeners New Year’s Day Flower Count…..as we did to herald in 2021. Our first count really caught your imagination with Club members identifying 66 different plant species in flower. Let’s see if we can beat that in 2022!

The idea is that you wander round your garden on New Year’s Day (or the nearest date you can get to that if the weather is rubbish) and count all the different flowers you can find.  Flowers must be fully open – not just in bud.  You’ll probably be surprised by just how much is out there if you get out and have a good look.  You can include any flower you find – which might be things you have planted or things that have arrived by themselves (aka weeds).

Make a note of their names (Latin or otherwise!) and email your results to Sue, our Programme Co-ordinator, at programme@grayshottgardeners.net  (you can even include pictures if you want to).  It’s not a competition – just a bit of fun.

We will put them together to show just how much Flower Power there is in a Grayshott January. Watch out for the results in the February newsletter and on our website.

JANUARY 2022 MEETING

Our first meeting of the new year is on Wednesday 12th January. At the time of writing, we are scheduled to meet in the Village Hall, at 7.30pm for 8.00pm, but please check your e-mail and/or the website for up-to-date information, nearer the time.

This month we have invited a local lad to speak. He may be local, but he is renowned throughout the world as a Rhododendrons and Azaleas specialist. David Millais, known to many of you, I’m sure, as the person who runs the Millais Nursery in Churt.

David’s nursery grows one of the widest ranges of Rhododendrons and Azaleas in the world; he has an unparalleled experience of the genus and has achieved 5 consecutive RHS Gold medals at Chelsea. The Millais family has been established at Crosswater Farm since 1947, but their Rhododendron heritage goes back to the naturalist, botanist and author J G Millais, who identified and described many Rhododendrons for the first time and published his great two volume series ‘Rhododendrons’ (1917 and 1924). Ted and Romy Millais started the nursery in 1970, and as septuagenarians they organized many exciting plant hunting trips to the Himalayas, and introduced several wonderful new species, some of which are offered there now.

We look forward to seeing you on the 12th.

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NAME THAT PLANT

Thank you to the people who responded with suggestions about the photograph of the flower featured in the December newsletter – Pat Barrett, Anne Butler, Karen Cozens, and Gordon Rae.  Both Karen and Gordon think it is a Eschscholzia californica – Californian poppy – while Pat thinks it’s a Eschscholzia caespitosa – tufted poppy (USA).  It’s difficult to tell exactly which, as they are very similar. Knowing how the whole plant looks, I’m tempted to think it’s a caespitosa – but will take a more detailed look at the next flowers just to be sure!

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Both these poppies do well in poor well drained soil, so good for our gardens. They both need full sun to flower fully though.  The E. californica is a vigorous bushy, spreading annual to 30cm, with finely divided blue-green leaves and orange, yellow or red flowers to 7cm across in summer.  It can also be grown as a drought-tolerant pot plant. The E. caespitosa is an annual forming a low mound of finely divided grey-green leaves with fragrant, 4-petalled bright flowers to 5cm across in summer.

For more information, see this link from the R.H.S.

For our February newsletter, please do send in a photo of any plant you would like help identifying – the deadline for submission is 15th January to Pamela Wright at shows@grayshottgardeners.net 

PLANT OF THE MONTH IN GRAYSHOTT

This month, our President, Gordon Rae, is providing information on the Winter Pansy. Please do let us know what you think of this feature which was introduced in response to reader request. You can contact Gordon at president@grayshottgardeners.net

WINTER PANSY

Our New Year’s Day survey of what is in flower in a Grayshott garden will yield an unexpectedly long list of plant names. From the list, the simple Winter Pansy will probably produce the widest range of riotous colour for the longest period of times of them all.

Planted in November/December they will flower continuously until spring. Winter Pansies (four (4) petals up and one (1) down) is a Pansy. Two (2) petals up and three (3) down is a Viola) are easy to grow from seed or plugs, are hardy and do particularly well in pots with spring bulbs, especially in a sunny position. The downside……the deer love them. In pots, in our front garden, they will continue to nibble all the new growth as it appears and this year we will not have any flower at all!

Here’s a link from the R.H.S. about the Winter Pansy as part of a winter collection in a container to brighten up a patio or balcony giving colour and interest over the cold season.

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Winter Pansy in January

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Winter Pansy eaten by Roe Deer

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Winter Pansy in a pot, still in flower in April

WHAT TO DO IN THE GARDEN IN THE MONTH OF JANUARY

1.Prune apples and pears

2.Clean pots and greenhouses ready for the spring

3.Dig over any vacant plots that have not been dug already

4.Disperse cast worms in lawns

5. Inspect stored tubers of Dahlia, Begonia and Canna for rots or drying out

6.Recycle your Christmas tree by shredding it for mulch

7.Start forcing rhubarb

8.Plan your vegetable crop rotation for the coming season

9.Keep putting out food and water for hungry birds

10.Make a polythene shelter for outdoor peaches and nectarines, to protect against peach leaf curl

The above list was taken from the R.H.S. website but you also may wish to see these links for more information:

Thompson-Morgan

Gardeners World

Bunny Guinness – who has been dreaming of a green Christmas

Sarah Raven

SOME GARDENING PODCASTS

And for those you into armchair gardening, here’s a link to some podcasts which member Karen Cozens has come across: The English Garden

Newsletter December 2021

Grayshott Gardeners Newsletter

December 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members 

My first pleasurable task as your new Chairman is to thank the three committee members who have resigned after many dedicated years of service. They, together with the rest of the committee, have successfully led us through the recent difficult times. They are Rosario Henshall (Secretary), who is succeeded by Anne Butler, Dennis Homer (Treasurer), who is succeeded by Alan Wright, whose wife Pamela is also taking over as Shows Co-ordinator from Leslia Farnfield.

For myself, those of you who were unable to have attended the AGM, it is my privilege to follow Anne Waddell who has been our Chairman and led us for the last three years.

For identification, I attach a picture of myself when out pursuing my other hobby as a serious photographer, taken when hunting stags (to photograph)! Together with existing committee members, I believe we have a strong and professional group of enthusiasts again to continue taking the Club forward.

It will be my pleasure to welcome you to our last lecture of the year on 8th December by Harry Baldwin. I look forward to seeing you then.

Best wishes, John

DECEMBER 2021 MEETING

Our Christmas meeting this year is on Wednesday 8th December.

The speaker is Harry Baldwin, a young dendrologist (study of trees and shrubs) and horticultural taxonomist; he has worked at the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew. His CV lists an impressive number of diplomas, honours and awards, as well as an array of practical experience and botanical travel trips worldwide. His articles have been published in botanical publications, he has been involved in organising and giving lectures, and is particularly passionate about reaching out to youngsters faced with making career choices.

Harry last came to speak to us in September 2019 and told us of his many travels. His lecture this year is entitled: ‘Oaks of the World’.

Mince pies and mulled wine will be served and there also will be a raffle. The meeting will be held in Grayshott Village Hall. Doors open at 7.30pm ready for the lecture to begin at 8pm.

Harry Baldwin and Gordon Rae

NAME THAT PLANT

Thank you to the three people who identified last month’s plant as an Astrantia – Anne Butler, Susan Erler and Gordon Rae.  Both Anne and Susan further clarified the plant as “major” with Anne suggesting the full name might be Astrantia Major Shaggy.

This plant likes full sun or partial shade, in fertile, moist, humus-rich soil. It flowers from June to August, dies back to below ground every Autumn, when it’s a good idea to mulch it, then new growth appears in the Spring.

This masterwort has very long, green-tipped white bracts that are often incurved to the middle and raggedly toothed towards the ends.  The bracts surround umbels of greenish white flowers, creating larger than average flower heads.

There are many different Astrantia Majors, it would be interesting to know if any other members are growing them, and if any do particularly well in Grayshott gardens.  Please email Anne, our newsletter editor, at newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net, so this feedback can be shared with other members in the next edition.

And here’s a link to the R.H.S. website giving more information.

The next plant we’d like some help with please is below – we could of course ask the bee!

If you think you know, please email Pamela at shows@grayshottgardeners.net by

15 December 2021. Hopefully, we will be able to “name that plant” in our January newsletter. 

Also, for our January newsletter, please do send in a photo of any plant you would like help identifying – the deadline for submission is 15 December.

GRAYSHOTT GARDENERS COMMITTEE 2022

Thank you to all of you who joined our AGM on 10th November….and special thanks to Chrissi Dye who, with her team, put on a wonderful spread for us all to enjoy once the formalities were over.

We now have a new committee with John Price as Chair. We shortly will be posting the full list of Committee members on our  website.

PLANT OF THE MONTH IN GRAYSHOTT

This month, our President, Gordon Rae, is providing information on Fothergilla major, Mountain Witch Alder. Please do let us know what you think of this feature which was introduced in response to reader request. You can contact Gordon at president@grayshottgardeners.net

FOTHERGILLA MAJOR

It may be unusual to choose a shrub such as Fothergilla major for Plant of the Month, but there is good reason. It has spectacular red, yellow and orange foliage in late Autumn, to complement the feathery, bottlebrush-like creamy white spikes of highly scented flowers in Spring, coming before the dark green foliage of Summer. See the photos in the next column.

Fothergilla is a native of the Appalachian Mountains of south-east USA. It is a slow growing shrub, reaching only 2-2.5m tall after 10-20 years, ideal for a small garden. It will thrive in the acidic soils of Grayshott in a well-drained spot in sun or partial shade. It is hardy, responds to mulching and the flowers attract bees, butterflies and moths.

Please see this R.H.S. link

for more information.

Flowers in Spring

Foliage in Autumn

WHAT TO DO IN THE GARDEN

IN THE MONTH OF DECEMBER

1. Check your winter protection structures are still securely in place

2. Check that greenhouse heaters are working

3. Insulate outdoor taps and prevent ponds from freezing

4. Prune open-grown apples and pears (but not those trained against walls)

5. Prune acers, birches and vines before Christmas to avoid bleeding

6. Harvest leeks, parsnips, winter cabbage, sprouts and remaining root crops

7. Trees and shrubs can still be planted and transplanted

8. Take hardwood cuttings

9. Keep mice away from stored produce

10. Reduce watering of houseplants

The above list was taken from the R.H.S. website, but you also may wish to see

these links for more information:

Thompson Morgan

Gardeners World

Bunny Guinness

Sarah Raven

NEW YEAR’S DAY FLOWER COUNT

We thought it might be fun to start 2022 with a Grayshott Gardeners New Year’s Day Flower Count…..as we did to herald in 2021. Our first count really caught your imagination with Club members identifying 66 different plant species in flower. Let’s see if we can beat that in 2022!

The idea is that you wander round your garden on New Year’s Day (or the nearest date you can get to that if the weather is rubbish) and count all the different flowers you can find.  Flowers must be fully open – not just in bud.  You’ll probably be surprised by just how much is out there if you get out and have a good look.  You can include any flower you find – which might be things you have planted or things that have arrived by themselves (aka weeds).

Make a note of their names (Latin or otherwise!) and email your results to Sue, our Programme Co-ordinator, at programme@grayshottgardeners.net  (you can even include pictures if you want to).  It’s not a competition – just a bit of fun.

We will put them all together to show just how much Flower Power there is in a Grayshott January.  Watch out for the results in our February newsletter and on our Grayshott Gardeners website.

SNOW DROP OPEN MORNING

Gordon and Judith Rae again are going to have a snowdrop open morning – it will either be Saturday 9th February or Saturday 16th February 2022. We will confirm exact date nearer the time and will let you know the details. In the meantime, you might want to note these dates in your diary.

Newsletter November 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members 

It was lovely to see so many of you at our keynote lecture last month when James Alexander-Sinclair talked about “A Life in Five Gardens” – well actually it was more than five! He was very entertaining.

This month on 10th November we have the A.G.M., followed by a buffet and drinks – see page 3. I, together with Rosario, Dennis and Leslia all stand down – with new officers at the helm for next year. I should like to convey warm thanks to my retiring colleagues and to thank all the Committee for what they have achieved in particularly challenging times. Our member numbers are as high as they have ever been, and we can look forward with confidence that Grayshott Gardeners will have even more success in the future. We are looking for new Committee members – particularly someone who can organise our outings. If you would like to know more, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Happy gardening and hope to see you at our A.G.M. on 10th November.

Best wishes, Anne Waddell

NAME THAT PLANT

The good news is that we’ve identified the plant featured in the October 2021 Newsletter as a Spirea – Sorbaria sorbifolia. Many thanks to Barbara Homer for confirming. 

This plant likes full sun to partial shade and fertile, well-drained soil that is neutral to slightly alkaline. It’s fully hardy and the feathery foliage emerges each spring in a bright pinkish-bronze flush, which quickly turns to fresh lime – and then a rich, dark green. Forming an attractive leafy mound, it is topped from midsummer with large cone-shaped clusters of small white flowers. The interest continues well into autumn, when the foliage changes colour once again – this time taking on reddish tones before the leaves are shed. It grows to 1.5m x 1.5m in 2-5 years, and it’s been awarded the RHS AGM, so a great addition to a Grayshott garden.

The next plant we’d like some help with please is:

If you think you know, please email Pamela Wright at shows@grayshottgardeners.net by 15 November 2021. Hopefully, we will be able to “name that plant” in our December newsletter.

PLANT OF THE MONTH IN GRAYSHOTT

This month, our President, Gordon Rae, is providing information on Nerines which do well in the local area, and which flower in the month of November. Please do let us know what you think of this feature which was introduced last month in response to reader request. You can contact Gordon at president@grayshottgardeners.net

NERINES

There are few plants to match the long-lasting burst of vivid reds, pinks, or whites of Nerines. They belong to the Lily family and are natives of South Africa. Not surprisingly, Nerines thrive best in sunny borders or under walls in free-draining soils.

There are over 20 different species of Nerines, but Nerine bowdenii is best suited to our Grayshott soils and conditions. N. bowdenii is fully hardy. It produces its leaves in spring. These die back in the summer and the bulbs flower without leaves in October/November.

Bulbs are best planted in spring, just below the surface and left for several years until they become crowded, at which point bulbs should be lifted, divided, and replanted.

Our Nerines came from my mother about 40 years ago. Nerines are highly recommended and cannot be bettered for a show of colour in October and November, when little else is in flower.

Please see this R.H.S. link for more information

And here’s a place where you can buy them……. although Grayshott Gardeners does not endorse any particular supplier and you may wish to shop around.

A.G.M.

10th November 2021

As notified to you already, this month, on Wednesday 10th November, we have our Annual General Meeting. It is in the Village Hall at 8pm; doors open at 7.30pm. This will be followed by our ever-popular light buffet with wine and soft drinks. Given that COVID is still prevalent, we will be doing all we can to keep us all safe – the nibbles will be ‘stand-alone’ items (so no diving into communal bowls of crisps or nuts!) and beverages will be served in disposable, compostable cups. You are encouraged to go onto the Grayshott Gardeners website for previous minutes and reports.

Our Chairman, Anne Waddell, Hon. Secretary, Rosario Henshall, Hon. Treasurer, Dennis Homer, and Shows Coordinator, Leslia Farnfield, all will be standing down from their roles and from the Committee. We warmly thank them for their many years of service to Grayshott Gardeners. It is hoped to confirm successors to Anne, Rosario, Dennis and Leslia at the meeting.

We ask that face coverings are worn on arrival, when moving around and on leaving the Hall, but optional when seated.

Chairs will be appropriately spaced out and you are requested not to move them.

The Hall will be well ventilated, so please come suitably dressed in case it is chilly.

Thank you for your cooperation. We look forward to seeing you on the 10th.

WHAT TO DO IN THE GARDEN

IN THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER

1. Clear up fallen leaves – especially from lawns, ponds, and beds

2. Raise containers onto pot feet to prevent waterlogging

3. Plant tulip bulbs for a spring display next year

4. Prune roses to prevent wind rock

5. Plant out winter bedding

6. Cover brassicas with netting if pigeons are a problem

7. Insulate outdoor containers from frost – bubble wrap works well

8. Stop winter moth damage to fruit trees, using grease bands around the trunks

9. Put out bird food to encourage winter birds into the garden

10. Use a seasonal bonfire – where this is allowed – to dispose of excess debris unfit for composting

The above list was taken from the R.H.S. website, but you also may wish to see

these links for more information:

Thompson-Morgan

Gardeners World

I’ve been advised that Bunny Guinness’ videos – on YouTube – are extremely good … lots of gardening hacks, design information and money saving suggestions

Sarah Raven

Thanks to Karen Cozens who suggested the last of the above two links.

BONFIRE NIGHT

It’s that time of the year again – Bonfire Night! It is a tradition on November 5th to light sparklers, fireworks, bonfires and eat candy apples and treacle toffee for the anniversary of an attempt to blow up the Houses of Parliament, known as the Gunpowder Plot. Did you know that it’s a common fact that the most firework bursts and effects are named after flowers/plants/trees? There are, for example, Chrysanthemum, dahlia, willow, palm, and peony bursts. In fact, several firework arrangements are known as bouquets. So, if you don’t want to head out to the local park to see the community fireworks display, you can lay out in your garden (in the warmer months!) and just look at nature’s version. The colours are just as spectacular, except it’s a lot quieter.

See the JParkers website for information about some spectacular blooms to light up your garden in the spring, summer and  autumn, together with safety  tips for bonfire night in the garden.

 

10 EXPLOSIVE BLOOMS TO LIGHT UP YOUR GARDEN

Allium Fireworks

1.      Allium Fireworks

2.      Agapanthus Mixed

3.      Allium Schubertii

4.      Asters Alpinus Mixed

5.      Monarda Mixed

6.      Euphorbia Bonfire

7.      Pieris Forest Flame

8.      Salix Caprea Pendula

9.      Astrantia Moulin Rouge

10.   Aquilegia Barlow Mixed

Euphorbia ‘Bonfire’

Newsletter October 2021

Grayshott Gardeners Newsletter

October 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members 

It was lovely to see you at September’s lecture when Harriet Rycroft talked to us about planting pots – and gave us a nifty demonstration using her mobile phone!

This month we have a key-note lecture when James Alexander-Sinclair is going to talk about “A Life in Five Gardens”. James is a celebrity gardener, often recognisable by his hat! We are sure he will delight us with his brilliant communication skills.

In this newsletter, we report on the results of the survey which was undertaken in July to get your views on the newsletter and website. You will see a few changes to the newsletter based on what you told us – thank you to everyone who did the survey. Your feedback is important in helping make sure that Grayshott Gardeners club meets your needs.

We also are reminding you that next month is the A.G.M. We are looking for new Committee members – particularly someone who can organise our outings. If you would like to know more, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Happy gardening and looking forward to seeing you at our next meeting on 13th October.

Best wishes, Anne Waddell

WHAT IS IT?

Results for No. 10

The answer for September 2021 was an acorn. Three members correctly identified the photo – Anne Butler, Karen Cozens (again!) and Anne Preston. Congratulations.

This is the last of our ‘What Is It?’ section for the time being – based on feedback you gave us in the GG Survey – see more on page 2. Warm thanks to Gordon who provided the photos and to the many of you who entered – it was a good bit of fun during the pandemic.

WHAT YOU TOLD US

An on-line survey of Grayshott Gardener members was conducted in July 2021 to elicit views on the newsletter and website. Over 25% of members completed the survey. Thank you! Your feedback will be very helpful in shaping future the future of the club.

The results of the survey have been analysed and considered by the Committee. A clear message was the need for more Grayshott-specific gardening related items. With some of the feedback, we have been able to get on and do things; there are other areas that require your help to make happen.

Some of the actions under way include:

  • ‘Retiring’ the Crossword – well done to Leslia for producing it monthly for the last 9 months. It served us well during the pandemic.
  • Replacing the ‘What Is It’ photographic quiz – thanks again to Gordon – it certainly achieved the aim of helping to foster a sense of community (even competitive!) spirit amongst the Grayshott Gardeners – with ‘Name that Plant’ – see next page.
  • Including routinely in the newsletter links to websites that offer tips on ‘What to Do in the Garden This Month’.
  • Including within the annual programme some lectures with an ‘eco’ content – so on a topic that is environmentally friendly and sustainable.
  • Setting up a Seed Swap. The idea is that a member brings their surplus seeds in an envelope(s) to a table in the registration area on the lecture night/show day and, in return, takes an envelope(s) with seeds they want. After the lecture/show, members will be e-mailed to let them know what seeds are still available if members are interested. Helen has offered to get this going and she plans to also have on the table some gently used gardening books for sale, with the proceeds going to GG. Look out for when this starts.
  • Continue with our mini-plant sales from Committee members’ houses – a pandemic initiative which has proved a welcome income stream for club funds; members will be notified of these via e-mail.

Other ideas put forward require your help, so we would love to hear from anyone who thinks they can volunteer or would like to comment – please contact any Committee member or e-mail newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net

  • Develop a buddy system…..where a ’newbie’ gardener is matched with a more experienced gardener to provide mentoring support.
  • Have practical workshops – hosted by a member and open to members to give advice/share tips/talk about successes and failures e.g., on pruning, on growing fruit, on growing vegetables etc.
  • Set up a ‘blog’ on our website – a forum where members can ‘talk’ with each other, ask questions, provide answers – in a more immediate way than provided for with the monthly newsletter. Initially, we are going to determine the feasibility of doing this, but we would love to hear from you about whether you think the idea of a blog is a good one.

OCTOBER 2021 MEETING

This month, on Wednesday 13th October, we are delighted to welcome key-note speaker James Alexander Sinclair. The lecture is entitled “A Life in Five Gardens”.

James is a renowned gardener designer, writer, broadcaster and R.H.S. judge. Who doesn’t love his wonderful column in Gardeners World magazine!

For more about James see this link.

The lecture is at 8.00 pm. Doors open at 7.15 pm as we are expecting this to be popular.

The arrangements are as follows:

-face coverings to be worn on arrival, when moving around and on leaving the Hall, but optional when seated

– owing to the volume of members expected, the chairs will be spaced a little closer than at our September lecture

-the Hall will be well ventilated

-there will be NO REFRESHMENTS

-there will be NO PLANT SALE

-there will be a RAFFFLE

-in order to avoid over-crowding, on arrival there will be four people manning the ‘Sign-In’ desks; there will be an additional table for visitors (for whom there is an £8 entry charge)

– no pens will be used by attendees, so please give your name clearly to the Committee Member who will tick off your names on the attendance list (we don’t always recognise people when wearing masks!).

Thank you for your cooperation.

NAME THAT PLANT

Thank you to everyone who entered our virtual summer show.  There were some beautiful entries – although the judges couldn’t quite identify some of the plants.  Perhaps you can help with this one?

If you think you know, please email our Show Coordinator, Pamela Wright at shows@grayshottgardners.net by 15 October 2021. Hopefully, we will be able to “name that plant” in our November newsletter.

No doubt many members have lovely plants in their gardens, but they are not sure what they are.  Please do send in a photo (to newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net) for a future newsletter, and others can help with their identification!

PLANT OF THE MONTH IN GRAYSHOTT

One of the messages in the survey was that you wanted to know about what will grow in Grayshott. So, we are introducing a new feature where we will showcase, each month, a plant which should do well in the local area, and which should be in flower in the month of the newsletter. It is planned to provide a little bit of information, a photo or two and link(s) to a website where you can read further details. Please do let us know what you think and what would enhance this item. You can contact Gordon at president@grayshottgardeners.net.

CHINESE ANEMONE

The Chinese Anemone or Japanese Windflower (Anemone hupehensis) is a native of China and East Asia and a member of the Buttercup family (Ranunculaceae).

In September/October, it produces a display of the purest white or pale to dark pink petals around a circle of bright yellow anthers and a green central dome. It is a deciduous, herbaceous perennial, growing easily in most soils, in all conditions from full sun to shade, spreading, once established, by suckers.

For pure white try the single ‘Honorine Jobert’ and ‘Wild Swan’, for pink, ‘Praecox’, ‘Hadspen Abundance’ and “Splendens’.

For more details see this link.

Anemone x hybrida ‘Whirlwind’

Anemone hupehensis var. japonica ‘Splendens’

NOTICE OF A.G.M.

10th November 2021

You all should have received an e-mail giving notice of our A.G.M. on 10th November 2021 at 8pm. Included with this notice was an agenda and a nominations form for the 2022 Committee. If you did not receive, please contact Rosario, our secretary, at secretary@grayshottgardeners.net.

Rosario also should be contacted if you wish to propose items for consideration at the A.G.M. – the proposal needs to be submitted no later than 27th October 2021.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

The crossword puzzle now has been ‘retired’; based on your feedback in the survey. Thank you again to Leslia who has been our crossword puzzle creator extraordinaire! Attached are the answers to September’s crossword.

WHAT TO DO IN THE GARDEN

IN THE MONTH OF OCTOBER

1.Divide established rhubarb crowns to create new plants

2. Cut back perennials that have died down

3. Divide herbaceous perennials

4. Move tender plants, including aquatic ones, into a greenhouse or conservatory

5. Plant out spring cabbages

6. Harvest apples, pears, grapes, and nuts

7. Prune climbing roses

8. Finish collecting seeds from the garden to sow next year

9. Last chance to mow lawns and trim hedges in mild areas

10. Renovate old lawns or create new grass areas by laying turf

The above list was taken from the R.H.S. website, but you may also wish to see

these links for more information:

Gardeners World

Thompson-Morgan

Newsletter September 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members 

It was lovely to see so many of you in person at our August lecture when Roger Hirons talked to us about ‘The Plant Doctor: Acidic Soils and Dry, Shady Locations’. Roger was very entertaining, and a good time seemed to be had by the many members who attended – far more than was anticipated. The arrangements that were put in place by the Committee to keep us all safe have been reviewed and we will continue with the same measures for our 8th September meeting, when Harriet Rycroft will be talking (I am told that her talk is very good!). The details are on page 2.

From October onwards you will start to see some changes to the newsletter and website, based on the comments received in the survey. Thank you to all of you who took part. Your feedback is very valuable in helping determine future interaction with club members. The Committee, at its September meeting, will discuss the results of the survey, and agree what can be done to make improvements for the membership. It is really encouraging to see your positive feedback about what we managed to achieve as a club during the pandemic – as well your ideas for the club’s future development.

Happy gardening and looking forward to seeing you at our next club meeting on 8th September.

Best wishes, Anne Waddell

WHAT IS IT?

Results for No. 9 & Photo for No. 10

The answer for August 2021 was an emerging conifer seedling. No member correctly identified the photo. Is it too difficult or are members wanting something different? Watch this space!

                                   Photo No. 9

And here is photo no. 10:

If you think you know what it is, please e-mail Gordon Rae at president@grayshottgardeners.net

by 15 September 2021. We will provide the answer and the names of those who correctly identified the photo in our October newsletter.

SEPTEMBER 2021 MEETING

This month, on Wednesday 8th September, we are really pleased once again to be hosting a lecture at the Village Hall. The lecture is being given by Harriet Rycroft and is entitled “Planting Pots for Winter Interest and Spring Joy”. Here is what Harriet says about herself: “Ex-Head Gardener at Whichford Pottery, now free-range gardener, speaker, writer. Gardening is my focus, but I may stray into natural history, rural matters, travel, art…..we’ll see”. Here’s a link to Harriet’s website: Harriet Rycroft.

The lecture is at 7.30 for 8.00 pm. The arrangements are as follows:

– face coverings to be worn on arrival, when moving around and on leaving the Hall, but optional when seated

-seats will be a chair width apart (approx. 18”)

-the Hall will be well ventilated

-there will be NO REFRESHMENTS

-there will be a PLANT SALE

-in order to avoid over-crowding, on arrival there will be two people manning the ‘Sign-In’ desk

– no pens will be used by attendees, so please give your name clearly to the Committee Member who will tick your names off the attendance list (we don’t always recognise people when wearing masks!).

Thank you for your cooperation.

MEMBERS OF GRAYSHOTT GARDENERS

As of August 2021, our membership was 228 plus 6 Life Members. We have had 22 new Members in 2021 which we think is pretty good – considering we had no ‘live’ lectures and no ‘live’ shows for well over a year. This suggests that despite the restrictions placed upon us, our virtual lectures and virtual competitions have been a great hit. Our membership fees help to offset the lower plant sales and also mean that we can programme some really good speakers …. they are always thrilled at the numbers in the audience. Members can enjoy discounts at local gardening outlets in addition to the social benefits of being part of a thriving and vibrant gardening club.

Well done to everyone on the Committee for making this possible and special thanks to Jane Jones, our Membership Secretary. If you know of a neighbour or a friend who would like to join Grayshott Gardeners, please encourage them to contact Jane at membership@grayshottgardeners.net. Our website is open to all – see this link . Not only does it provide helpful write ups of all our lectures, but there is the wonderful photo gallery showcasing your flowers, gardens, and some of our visits.

RHS HILLTOP

THE HOME OF GARDENING SCIENCE

Have you visited R.H.S. Wisley recently? It is well worth a trip to see the new Hilltop, the UK’s first dedicated horticultural scientific centre of excellence – protecting the future of plants, people, and the planet.

The exciting new spaces include:

-three purpose built laboratories that support research

-a herbarium and digitisation suite

-two learning studios and a teaching garden

-three new gardens designed by RHS Chelsea medal winners

RHS Hilltop, the Home of Gardening Science, is a place to inspire the next generation of scientists; it officially opened on 24 June 2021. It cost £35 million and was the largest ever investment in horticultural science. You can step inside and see the RHS’s research being carried out, learn about the invaluable work of the RHS with interactive displays, marvel at the world-class collections and enjoy a bite to eat at a café where the produce is fresh from the gardens outside. And if that isn’t enough, you can enjoy unparalleled, panoramic views across the flagship garden while enjoying a drink on the Sky Terrace.

This drone footage captures the breath-taking scale and grandeur of Hilltop:

Hilltop Drone Footage.

See this link for more information.

In the next column, there are some photos of this amazing development.

LOCAL EVENTS IN SEPTEMBER

*** CHAPS (Churt Horticultural and Produce Society) Autumn Show in Churt Village Hall on Saturday 11th September from 2.30 to 4.00pm. Tea, coffee and homemade cakes are available.

*** RHS Wisley Flower Show 7th to 12th September; see here.

*** Heritage Open Day: Garden Tour of Chawton House 10th to 19th

September; see here

*** THE BRILLIANT AUTUMN GARDEN: THE POTAGER; 28th September at West Green House, Hook

The potager makes an autumn garden stunning. For here in traditional companion planting, often in geometric patterns, the bounty of a garden, its fruit, vegetable, flowers, and herbs mingle making this style of autumn garden the season’s most colourful.

The traditional garden techniques of espaliering fruit, the choice of vegetables that have both colour and abundance are explained to ensure your potager gives late season colour and goodness.

Morning coffee on arrival, with lunch featuring home-grown produce, served with wines from West Green House’s cellar.

Tickets are £55.00 pp. See this link for more information.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Attached is our Grayshott Gardeners crossword puzzle for September.

Please look out for the answers in the October newsletter. For those who can’t wait a whole month…or perhaps need a clue, the answers to the crossword will be posted on the website on 7th September 2021, in the ‘newsletter’ tab.  Attached to this newsletter are the answers to the August crossword puzzle which featured in our last newsletter. These answers also are on our website.

Newsletter August 2021

Grayshott Gardeners Newsletter

August 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members 

I do hope you are enjoying your gardens – despite the contrary weather. The plants and shrubs might be getting a watering, but so too are the weeds!

I am so delighted that our August lecture ‘The Plant Doctor: Acidic Soils and Dry, Shady Locations’ is going ahead in-person. You received an e-mail recently with the details to help keep us all safe. These are set out again on the page 3.

I am also thrilled that we had so many entrants in the virtual Summer Show. This was our first ever virtual show – and I hope our last!  Thank you to you our members for entering and the Shows Committee for making it happen, congratulations to the winners. The number of entries was high as was the quality of ‘exhibits’ – the entries can be seen on our website at this link and we include some photos on the next page.

Looking forward to seeing you on 11th August.

Best wishes, Anne Waddell

YOUR OPINION MATTERS!

Thank you to all of you who completed the survey seeking feedback on the newsletter and the website. Your opinions really are important in terms of shaping the club’s future development. The results currently are being analysed. They will be considered by the Committee in September, and we will report back in October/November.

WHAT IS IT? Results for No. 8 & Photo for No. 9

The answer for July 2021 was chits on a potato. No member correctly identified the photo.

Photo No. 8

And this is Photo No. 9

If you think you know what it is, please e-mail Gordon Rae at president@grayshottgardeners.net by 15 August 2021. We will provide the answer and the names of those who correctly identified the photo in our September newsletter.

FIRSTS IN GG’S VIRTUAL SUMMER SHOW 2021

This month we are featuring photos of the first placed winning entries of the eight classes. There were 99 entries in total and the quality of the entries was very high. The judges had a hard task to agree the placings – see all the entries on our website. Thank you to everyone who entered and warm congratulations to the winners.

Large Flowered Rose: Doris Marjoram

One Spray of Cluster Flowered Rose: Karen Cozens

Three Leaves of Different Hostas: Gilly Coleman

One Hydrangea Bloom: Dennis Homer

A Single Stem Any Garden Plant: Pauline Hudd

One Stem of a Hardy Perennial: Pamela J Fox

One Stem of a Flowering Tree or Shrub: Dennis Homer

 A Floral Arrangement of Mixed Blooms from Your Garden: Carol Wass

Photography Competition

“A Cosy Corner”

This year there were 12 entries in Class 76 of our virtual photography competition – far more than we would normally expect to see at a Summer Show in the Village Hall.  There was a wide range of interpretations of the brief “A Cosy Corner”. Once again, Kathleen Bird, President of the Ludshott Photographic Club, kindly agreed to judge the entries. 

Kathleen chose the photograph of Karen Cozens of a snake tucked away in the corner of her little pond as the winner.

Kathleen said that it fitted the brief perfectly and was the most imaginative of all the entries.  It would have been difficult to capture that instant, but it had been well done.  The photograph was well exposed and composed.  The snake eyeing the fly on the rock made it! Karen wins the £20 first prize.

Karen Cozens’ winning entry

Kathleen also highly commended:

-Liz Munson’s “Cat amongst the Fuchsias”

-Sheila Aitken’s “A Cosy Garden Scene”

-Carol Wass’s “Squirrel in the Feeder”

These photos are on the GG’s website.

Thanks to all who entered – it is much appreciated.

AUGUST 2021 MEETING

This month, on Wednesday 11th August, we are really pleased to be holding an in-person meeting in the Village Hall. The lecture is being given by Roger Hirons and is entitled “The Plant Doctor: Acidic Soils and Dry, Shady Locations”. Roger has over 35 years’ experience in the horticultural industry and is an enthusiastic speaker and broadcaster on all things related to plants. He qualified at Pershore College of Horticulture, after which he spent many years running plant centres. Roger’s talk will give ideas and tips to help us achieve good results with minimum effort.

The lecture is at 7.30 for 8.00 pm. The arrangements will be slightly different due to present circumstances:

-face coverings to be worn on arrival, when moving around and on leaving the Hall, but optional when seated

-seats will be a chair width apart (approx. 18”)

-the Hall will be well ventilated

-there will be no refreshments

-there will be a PLANT SALE

-in order to avoid over-crowding, on arrival there will be three people manning the ‘Sign-In’

– no pens will be used by attendees, so please give your name clearly to the Committee Member who will tick your names off the attendance list (we don’t always recognise people when wearing masks!).

Thank you for your cooperation.

NAME THAT PLANT

There were some very interesting and unusual plants entered in the virtual Summer Show; if you would like to know what a particular plant is, please email shows@grayshottgardeners.net, and we will contact the entrant and let you know. We can also include the photo and the identification in a future newsletter if several people ask about the same entry. Don’t forget, all the photos are on the website.

POTATO COMPETITION 2021

A huge thank you to everyone who entered the Potato Competition this year (class 49 of the Summer Show), to Mavis Hallt, judge, and to Gordon Rae for organising it. You have excelled yourselves. There were 19 entries out of the 25 who collected their seed potatoes in February, more than any previous year. One more and they would not have fitted on Paul Coleman’s table!

Our judge, Mavis Hallt, the wife of the late Mike Hallt, after whom the cup is named, arrived armed with her list of ‘Judging Criteria and Staging Hints’, ready to make some difficult decisions – see our website for what Mavis was looking for and photos of the exhibits. First prize was won by Andy Karayianni – well done Andy.

Mavis Hallt, judge, with Anne Waddell, Chairman

Andy Karayianni

Winner of the Mike Hallt Cup

Newsletter July 2021

Grayshott Gardeners Newsletter

July 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members 

Welcome to our July newsletter. I do hope you are continuing to stay safe.

I am sure that you are as disappointed as I am that the Summer Show has had to be cancelled because of the delay in easing COVID restrictions. However, all is not lost. We have a VIRTUAL Summer Show! You should have received details a few days back – and they are set out on page 3. I very much hope you will submit some entries (closing date 9th July) and my warm thanks to the Shows Committee for their sterling work at organising this at relatively short notice.

There also is a Potato Competition and a Photography Competition – thanks are due to Gordon who has done the organising of these. Details are on page 4 and 5.

Finally, I want to mention the survey. It will be sent to you (from GG Comms) on Monday 5th July and needs to be done within two weeks. It is very quick to do, and the feedback will help the Committee enormously to make improvements for Grayshott Gardeners. Thank you.

All the best, Anne Waddell, Chairman

WHAT IS IT? Results for No. 7 & Photo for No. 8

The answer for June 2021 was a sweet chestnut. It was in St. Luke’s church yard. Yet again,

member, Karen Cozens, was the only member who correctly identified the photo.

Photos no. 7 above.

And here is photo no. 8:

If you think you know what it is (and no, it’s NOT Paddington Bear!), please e-mail Gordon Rae president@grayshottgardeners.net by 15th July 2021. We will provide the answer and the names of those who correctly identified the photo in our August newsletter.

MY TOP FIVE PLANTS – from a GRAYSHOTT GARDENER

This month we feature the ‘Top 5 Plants’ of Committee member, John Price, our data protection lead and ZOOM coordinator, and his wife Margaret.

  Allium Siculum bulgaricum Nectaroscordum    This pretty flower with bells, which is very popular with the bees, is something different in the garden, because when in seed head form it looks castle like and remains attractive.
      Achillea Filipendulina Cloth of Gold        This has always been one of John’s favourites and we have them around our garden in pink form as well as the gold.
  Lathyrus Odoratus Sweet Peas  What can’t you say about these prolific and multicoloured flowers which have such sweet perfume? Like most things, we have had more success in Grayshott than Skipton – they don’t seem to like the wind and rain in Yorkshire!
              WisteriaWe have always admired these beautiful flowers on houses and hotels, thinking we had made it when we bought an old Victorian house in Skipton with an established wisteria growing against the house. After two years and two blooms a year, we happened to be in London and saw a sign in Selfridges saying there was a gardening expert in the basement to help you with your gardening problems. We rushed down to find this chap  all by himself, so asked him for help. He said, “where do you live?”, we said “Skipton in Yorkshire”! Thinking this would challenge him, he said ” I know it well – I was brought up in Ilkley a few miles away”! It was Alan Titchmarsh prior to his TV fame. He gave us suggestions, but despite feeding and pruning, when we left nearly 20 years later there was no change. So, when we arrived back in the sun belt of Grayshott (everything is relative), we bought a plant in bloom to make certain we knew it did bloom. We transplanted it into a large pot and placed it in a sunny spot against a large tree stump. NO BLOOMS the next year. Karen Flood assured us it was just settling into its new pot. She was right! This year at last we had a wisteria with nearly 100 blooms.
  Family Iridaceae FreesiasMargaret loves the perfume and beautiful colours, also, the novelty of growing your own, because again they would not grow in Skipton. Don’t get us wrong Skipton is a lovely town on the edge of the Dales where we enjoyed living for 46 years, but it’s not a gardener’s paradise!

As yet, we don’t have any member lined up for a contribution to our next newsletter. So how about something from you? Don’t forget that any member can submit an article; it can be about your ‘Top Five Plants’ or about any garden related topic – the only criterion is that it is about your garden! Contact the editor at newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net

14th July 2021 MEETING

This month, on Wednesday 14th July, we are delighted to welcome, via ZOOM, Helen Picton, whose lecture is ‘Daisy Days’. Helen is a specialist grower of autumn-flowering asters. The Picton family operates Old Court Nurseries and the Picton Garden in Herefordshire. The nursery was established in 1906 by Ernest Ballard, the first nurseryman to popularize autumn-flowering asters. The Pictons hold the Plant Heritage National Plant Collection of autumn-flowering asters, with more than four hundred forms present in the collection.

Helen joined the business after completing a botany degree at the University of Reading, and since has been working full time with asters. She also lectures and gives talks throughout the U.K. and is the author of ‘Plant Lover’s Guide to Asters’.

This club night lecture is open to all members starting at 8pm, but as always you can log in at 7.30pm for a bit of a chat, before we are all ‘muted’ ready for the lecture.

Further details about logging in can be obtained from Helen Deighan at comms@grayshottgardeners.net, if you are not already registered. Details automatically will be sent to all those members who registered for the previous ZOOM lectures. On the night of the lecture, it will be possible to admit up to 100 people on ZOOM – so first come, first served.

As COVID restrictions gradually start to ease, we are looking forward to returning to the Village Hall. We very much hope that the August lecture is in-person – watch this space!

SUMMER SHOW 2021

We are really excited to be putting on a virtual Summer Show in the light of the cancellation of our Show scheduled to take place on 10th July. You all should have received details recently (from ‘GG Comms’), and they are on website too here . Here they are again, in case you need them:

The Show is just for fun and there are no prizes, but we do hope you will get a lot of pleasure out of going round your garden to take your photos and then deciding which ones to enter. If nothing else, you will have a wonderful record of your garden this summer. The deadline for sending in your photos is 5pm on Friday 9th July.  The classes are:

  1. One large, flowered rose
  2. One spray of cluster flowered rose
  3. Three leaves of different hostas
  4. One hydrangea bloom
  5. A single stem of any garden plant
  6. One stem of a hardy (herbaceous) perennial
  7. One stem of a flowering tree or shrub
  8. A floral arrangement of mixed blooms from your garden

You can enter one photo for each class, and you can send your entries separately.  You cannot enter a class more than once, and members are asked that the photos have been taken in the month leading up to 9th July. Please send your entries to: shows@grayshottgardeners.net.

E-mails should have the subject line “Show Entry from (your name)”, and your attached photos should be named with “Your name and class being entered”.

The judging will be undertaken by members of the Show Committee, and results will be published on the website. Please do submit entries and enjoy!

GG OUTING 28th JULY 2021

Unfortunately, our GG outing on Wednesday 23rd June to Sandhill Farm near Romsey, home of Andy and Ros McIndoe, had to be cancelled. If any of you would still like to visit this private garden, please do look on Andy’s website here and keep an eye out for days when he and Ros are hosting individual bookings.

Our next Grayshott Gardeners outing is on Wednesday 28th July 2021, to Houghton Lodge Gardens near Stockbridge. Idyllically set above the tranquil waters of the River Test, there are both formal and informal gardens, a traditional kitchen garden enclosed within chalk cob walls, an orchid house, topiary dragon and peacock garden; see here for more information.

If you are interested in joining this outing, you’ll need to contact Sue Wheeler, our Programme Coordinator, programme@grayshottgardeners.net.

As always, we need to ensure we are COVID-compliant and do all we can to keep ourselves and fellow members safe.

WE WANT YOUR VIEWS

This month, Grayshott Gardeners Committee is running a brief survey for your views on the newsletter and the website. The Committee will

be so appreciative if each member completes it …remember that Grayshott Gardeners club is only as good as its members – so please do tell us what you think so we can consider your feedback and where, we can, make improvements. The survey will be sent to you on Monday 5th July 2021; it closes on Monday 19th July 2021.

POTATO COMPETITION 2021

Once again, we are running our Potato Competition at arm’s length.

Class 49 of the Summer Show Schedule

3 potatoes of the variety supplied by the Society for the Potato Competition and grown however the exhibitor wishes.

For the competition:

– Please deliver your 3 potatoes in a bag with your contact details – including name, address, telephone number – and confirm in an e-mail to Gordon Rae, by 6pm on Friday 9th July 2021

– Please state if you wish to reclaim your exhibit from Gordon’s house on Sunday 11th July

– Gordon has arranged for Mavis Haltt (the widow of Mike Haltt, after whom the cup was named, but donated by our ex-president, Olive Robinson) to judge the competition this year at 10am on Saturday 10th July at Gordon’s house

– The winner, 2nd and 3rd places will be announced by e-mail to members and the Mike Haltt Cup will be presented to the winner at a future meeting

– We know that many of you have been growing the Grayshott Gardeners potatoes and we hope that you will enter and yet again help to keep Grayshott Gardeners alive during these difficult months

– The other reason for wanting a good entry is that the President and Mrs President hope to get another decent sized boiling from any unclaimed potatoes left at their house after the event!

PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION

SUMMER 2021

Although our Summer Show scheduled for 10th July has reluctantly had to be cancelled, by the Committee, due to Bojo’s ongoing COVID restrictions, the Photographic Competition will still go ahead by e-mail.

Class 76 of the Summer Show Schedule 2021

‘A Cosy Corner’ – a photograph taken by the exhibitor.

To enter, please e-mail your entry (one entry per member) to president@grayshottgardeners.net .

Entries will close at 6pm on Friday 9th July 2021.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Attached is our Grayshott Gardeners crossword puzzle for July.

Please look out for the answers in the August newsletter. For those who can’t wait a whole month…or perhaps need a clue, the answers to the crossword will be posted on the website here on 7th July 2021, in the ‘newsletter’ tab.

Attached to this newsletter are the answers to the June crossword puzzle which featured in our last newsletter. These answers also are on our website grayshottgardeners.net in the ‘newsletter’ tab.

SURREY HORTICULTURAL FEDERATION: GARDEN VISITS ON 18th JULY 2021

We have received notification of the SHF Garden Visits on Sunday 18th July 2021, and they look like a great afternoon out. One is in Wonersh and the other in Albury. Here are further details.

 2 CHINTHURST LODGE, WONERSH COMMON, GU5 0PR. Open from 11.30 am, Closes 5pm.

VALE END, CHILWORTH ROAD, ALBURY, GU5 9BE. Open from 2.30 pm, Closes 5pm.

Refreshments will be available at each garden. Tickets £5 – gives entrance to both gardens.

Newsletter June 2021

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Grayshott Gardeners newsletter

June 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members 

Welcome to our June newsletter. We are inching closer to ‘normal’ and, fingers crossed, we may be able to host our summer show in the Village Hall on Saturday 10th July, so please check your yellow Schedules for what you might enter. Wouldn’t it be marvellous to have a bumper number of entries – the results of all your labour during the long, hard months of lockdown. Whether or not we can hold the show depends on the government advice and the views of the Village Hall Trustees at the time, so please look out for information on our website here and in the July newsletter.

We know that both our June and July lectures will continue to be on ZOOM – please see page 3 for further details.

The recent rain might have dampened our spirits and put paid to some of our walks in the beautiful local countryside, but our gardens have literally soaked it up. Everything is greening up beautifully, our seedlings are being potted on, the trees are abundant with leaves and hopefully the frosts have passed. We have even managed mows of the lawns in-between the showers.


Keep well and enjoy your summer gardening.

All the best, Anne Waddell, Chairman

WHAT IS IT?

Results for No. 6 & Photo for No. 7

The winner for May 2021 was member, Karen Cozens (yet again!), who correctly identified the photo as the base of a pumpkin.

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This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is May-answer.jpg

Photos no. 6 above.

Karen is to be congratulated for her success in identifying all the mystery photos over the past six months – sometimes others identified the photos correctly too, but no-one, except Karen, has had a 100% winning streak. It will be lovely to receive entries from other GG members too and have your name(s), as ‘winners’, featured in the newsletter.

And here is photo no. 7:

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is June-close-up.jpg

If you think you know what it is, please e-mail Gordon Rae president@grayshottgardeners.net

by 15 June 2021. We will provide the answer and the names of those who correctly identified the photo in our July newsletter.

MY TOP FIVE PLANTS – from a GRAYSHOTT GARDENER

This month we feature the ‘Top 5 Plants’ of our Communications lead, Helen Deighan.

I must admit that I am not the best gardener in the world. I love my garden, but it really must do a lot of looking after itself, while I am weaving in my little studio. Consequently, my favourite plants are plants that do just that.

Common VioletsOr, in fact, violets in any shape or form. I love the way they just pop up in unexpected places and give a little joy. I also love them as they remind me of my wedding day. I carried a small posy of violets to match Michael’s purple jabot!
CosmosCosmos plants in any colour are essential for my summer garden, reaching varying heights and in many colours, adding frilly texture to the flower bed. Growing cosmos is simple and cosmos flower care is easy and rewarding when single or double blooms appear on stems reaching 1 to 4 feet (0.5 to 1 m.) Just a bit of dead heading – that’s all they ask.         
  SchizostylisThis is a plant that blooms when everything else is closing down – that’s why I love it. It is a genus of flowering plants within the Iridaceae family, native to South Africa. Within this region, it is commonly referred to as the Scarlet River Lily or the Kaffir Lily. Schizostylis coccinea are semi-evergreen rhizomatous perennials. They fashion slender, sword-shaped leaves and star-like blooms that flourish from late summer through to late autumn.
Mme. Alfred Carrière RoseOnce again, I must admit I am not good at growing roses – they always seem to die on me! But this lovely lady comes good every year and can be seen flowering in November. It bears large, cupped, rather informal, creamy white blooms tinged with pink, which have a strong, sweet fruity fragrance. First flowering in June/July, it repeats until late in the season.
BergeniaBergenia comes into flower when you need it – at that time when you think Spring will never come you get a wonderful display of pink flowers. They are evergreen rhizomatous perennials with leathery, rounded leaves and dense, erect clusters of bell-shaped pink or white flowers in spring. If you’ve got a shady spot you want to brighten in your garden but you’re tired and bored with hostas, then Bergenia might be just the plant you’re looking for. Bergenia, also known aspigs squeak’ for the sound it makes when two leaves are rubbed together, fills that shady or dappled spot in your garden where so many flowers shy away. And they are low-maintenance plants – another reason to love them.

Next month John Price (who does the ‘techy’ side of our ZOOM lectures) and his wife, Margaret, are going to share with us their list of their top five plants. Don’t forget that any member can submit an article; it can be about your ‘Top Five Plants’ or about any garden related topic – the only criterion is that it is about your garden! Contact the editor at newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net.

JUNE  2021 MEETING

This month, on Wednesday 9 June, we are delighted to welcome Iain Pentney to our ZOOM stage. Ian is the Sales Manager at Classiflora Imports Ltd., in north London, which specialises in the import of hardy European specimen, plants, trees and shrubs; amongst his customers is Windsor Castle. Ian will talk about “Mediterranean Plants, Why Buy from Abroad” and will be letting us into the secret of using European plants in our English gardens.

This club night lecture is open to all members starting at 8pm, but as always you can log in at 7.30pm for a bit of a chat, before we are all ‘muted’ ready for the lecture.

Further details about logging in can be obtained from Helen Deighan at comms@grayshottgardeners.net, if you are not already registered. Details automatically will be sent to all those members who registered for the previous ZOOM lectures. On the night of the lecture, it will be possible to admit up to 100 people on ZOOM – so first come, first served.

As COVID restrictions gradually start to ease, we are looking forward to returning to the Village Hall for Club nights.

Our July speaker, Helen Picton, will be talking to us about asters – in a lecture called ‘Daisy Days’. This will be a ZOOM lecture.

We will keep the format of our August lecture under review. By then, well will have more idea about Village Hall capacity, rules etc. in a post-COVID world.

RECORDINGS OF ZOOM LECTURES

Don’t forget that, when possible, we record our lectures too and they are available, after the lecture, for a time limited period if you didn’t have a chance to ZOOM in or want to listen to it again. You will receive details of the recordings via e-mail from comms@grayshottgardeners.net .

GG OUTINGS MAY & JUNE 2021

Over 20 of us enjoyed our first GG outing, post-lockdown, to West End Flower Farm in May. We started with a socially-distanced coffee in the tepee, then had a walk ‘n talk in the poly tunnel with Will Butler, co-owner with his wife Bella, followed by a self-guided tour of the farm where gorgeous flowers are grown. Wellies were essential! Most of us rounded off our visit with a wonderful lunch. Thank you to Barbara Homer for coordinating this visit.

Our next GG outing on Wednesday 23rd June is to Sandhill Farm near Romsey, home of Andy and Ros McIndoe. Andy was the speaker at our May ZOOM lecture, and he inspired us with his journeys through some wonderful English gardens. Sandhill Farm is around 2 acres in area, a sloping hillside with a large area of meadow. The planting is naturalistic and includes a wide variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials. The terrace features numerous pots and containers: there is a small gravel garden and two ponds.

The afternoon visit starts at 14.00 and finishes around 16.30-17.00. It includes a tour, followed by tea and cakes or Pimms + nibbles and there is the opportunity to ask questions and explore the garden individually. Books and plants are for sale. The outing is self-drive and there is a £10.00 entry fee per person.

If you are interested in joining this outing, you’ll need to e-mail Anne Waddell, our chairman. Anne will send out further information, to those signed up, nearer the date of the visit.

As always, we need to ensure we are COVID-compliant and do all we can to keep ourselves and fellow members safe.

PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION – SPRING

Thank you again to everyone who submitted photos in our Spring Photographic competition. We had an amazing 21 entries – compared to our usual 4 or 5. The competition “It Looks Like Spring” was judged by Eileen Bird, past-Chairman of Ludshott Photographic Club.

The winner, who was awarded a prize of £20.00, was Carol Wass – well done Carol. She submitted this idyllic picture of ‘My Garden’.

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Carol also sent in a short video of what Mr.

pheasant gets up to in her garden apart from

eating the chicken food and prancing around with his wives. See the attachment to this newsletter.

In second place was ‘It Looks Like Spring’ by Liz Munson; in third place, ‘Spring Colour’ by Alex Anderson; highly commended was ‘Spring Iris’ by Sue Wheeler. Two photos which didn’t make it into the winners, but none the less caught the eye of the judge with their humour, were ‘Rhubarb and Custard’ by Jan Bebbington and ‘Spring has Sprung’ by Karen Cozens.

Congratulations to all entrants; full details and winning photos can be found on our website here .

GRAYSHOTT GARDENERS’ TALES

Kitty Holden and her long-time friend, Eileen Bond, were members and supporters of Grayshott Gardeners for many years.

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Kitty (l) and Eileen (r)

Kitty lived in Church Lane and outside her front door was a pink, semi-double Camellia, which we think is most probably ‘Donation’. When Kitty was over 90 years old, she moved into residential care near to her son but, before leaving, Gordon Rae, our President, took some cuttings from her much-loved Camellia. Having never tried to root Camellias before, Gordon was pleasantly surprised that they rooted. He is bringing them on and, in due course, will offer the plants for sale to help our GG funds along.

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‘Donation’ is easy to grow and highly floriferous. It is considered one of the best Camellias of the 20th century.

If you have a Grayshott Gardeners Tale you’d like to share, please get in touch with the editor at newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net.

PLANT SALES – WHAT WE’VE ACCHIEVED

What an amazing club Grayshott Gardeners is! During April and May this year, members held plant sales which have raised an amazing £686 to go towards GG funds. Rosario, our secretary, had a raffle at a plant sale she hosted, raising £60. The plant sale itself, with contributions from Dennis (our treasurer), Gordon (our President) and Rosario, generated £304. Gordon also had numerous snowdrop sales raising £260. And Anne (our Chairman) raised £62. Well done!

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Attached is our Grayshott Gardeners crossword puzzle for June.

Please look out for the answers in the July newsletter. For those who can’t wait a whole month…or perhaps need a clue, the answers to the crossword will be posted on the website here on 7th June 2021, in the ‘newsletter’ tab.

Attached to this newsletter are the answers to the May crossword puzzle which featured in our last newsletter. These answers also are on our website grayshottgardeners.net in the ‘newsletter’ tab.

PLANT SALES – AND MORE – TO COME

We have been contacted by three members who have plants or garden related items that need good homes. We would just ask, if you get any of these, that a small donation is made to GG.

Leslia (our crossword maker!) has some spare brassicas and other veg. Those that are ready are Brussel Sprouts, Calabrese, and Cabbage. Coming soon are Cavolo Nero and Swede. If anyone would like any then please email Leslia and she will arrange delivery/collection.

Member Margaret Penfold has the following items which might be of use – a dozen seed trays, approx. size 36 x 22 x 5 cms. and 5 tomato rings for putting in gro-bags. If you are interested, please call Margaret.

And another member, Anne Noyce, will pot up some woodruff for anyone who may be interested. She says: ‘I know that many people might view these as “weeds”!  But I have a good population of woodruff in my front garden and would be happy to give some plants to anyone who would like some.  I think it is a beautiful plant, wonderful, pretty ground cover, and, as well as being evergreen, it’s a herb, so it can be used in summer drinks too! It’s not fully out yet but will be a carpet of white flowers soon’. Please contact Anne via e-mail if you are interested in the woodruff.

Thank you to everyone who, through these sales, help boost our funds.

Newsletter May 2021

Grayshott Gardeners Newsletter

May 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Members 

Things really are looking up and hopefully we can get together before too long.

I have some sad news to tell you.  Beryl Bamford has recently peacefully passed away.  Beryl was Chairman in 1998 and a long-standing member of our gardening Club, a much loved and very dedicated member for many years and we shall all miss her greatly, especially all the work she did in the Village to keep the flowers looking lovely.

One of our Committee Members, Terry French, unfortunately has had to stand down, so we are looking for someone to replace her on our Shows Committee. Terry was especially helpful on the days of our two shows each year. If you think you can help or would like more information, please contact Pamela Wright at shows@grayshottgardeners.net.

Keep well and enjoy your Spring gardening.

All the best, Anne Waddell, Chairman

SHUTTLECOCK FERNS WANTED

A member, Tricia Henson, has been in touch saying “I had a visiting dog trash our patch of shuttlecock ferns last year and it doesn’t look too promising. If anyone is planning to send some to the (virtual) sales, I’d like to get a few replacements”. If you can help, please get in touch with Tricia via comms@grayshottgardeners.net. Thank you.

MAY GG OUTING IS GOING AHEAD!

How exciting that, at the time of writing, the GG outing to West End Flower Farm, on Wednesday 26 May IS going ahead. We, of course, need to ensure we are COVID-compliant and do all we can to keep ourselves and fellow members safe.

We meet at the venue at 10.30 am and, at your own pace, you can explore the farm where beautiful flowers are grown. But first you might want to grab a take-away coffee and a slice of one of their delicious cakes and meet for a socially distanced catch-up in a tepee which has been reserved solely for members of Grayshott Gardeners. After your self-guided tour of the farm, there is the opportunity for some retail therapy – local produce and a selected number of products that have been used extensively across the farm – whether it be for growing their gorgeous flowers, serving in the restaurant or using items in their arrangements.

West End Flower Farm is in Froyle, Alton, Hampshire GU34 4JG. To find out more about the farm please use this link .

If you plan to join the outing, please notify Barbara Homer. Please put ‘GG’ in the subject line of your e-mail to Barbara.

MY TOP FIVE PLANTS – for a sunny summer border – from a GRAYSHOTT GARDENER

This month we feature the ‘Top 5 Plants’ of our Programme Coordinator, Sue Wheeler. Sue also takes care of the content of our website:

Just like everyone else who has attempted this exercise, I found choosing my Top Five Plants nigh on impossible.  It’s right up there in the difficulty stakes with trying to choose your Desert Island Discs.  So, I have cheated, and focused my selection on the five flowery plants that I wouldn’t be without for a summer border.  I hope my list will conjure up visions of the sunny days ahead of us …..

Rosa ‘Constance Spry’Constance Spry, climbing over a pergola at the back of a border, is a must for me.  It’s such a pretty pink, with a lovely rosy scent.  It doesn’t repeat flower but makes up for that by giving a spectacular show once a year.  My Mum was a “Connie” – so we call this “Mum’s rose”.
Hydrangea paniculata ‘Magical Moonlight’This is a really beefy hydrangea paniculata.  It gets to about 8 foot tall, so perfect for the back of a large border.  Its huge flowers start off pure white, and gradually fade to pink, before finally leaving papery seed heads which last through to the next spring.  
Veronicastrum virginicum ‘Fascination’  These wands of flowers have an ombre look – graduating from deep purple at the tips through to white at the base.  It is tall and wavy and flowers all summer.  And you often get fasciated blooms (hence the name) which are weird and wonderful and make a great talking point.  
Thalictrum delavayi ‘Hewitt’s Double’To provide a real contrast, this Thalictrum is frothy, light and airy.  You can see right through it, like a lilac veil.  It makes me want to reach out and run my hand through it.  And it has lovely grey/green lacy foliage too.  
Echinacea pallidaThis is my favourite echinacea.  Not very long lived (I’ve managed to get 3 seasons out of them and then have to replace) but so relaxed, with their reflexed, floppy petals and their distinctive cones that the bees adore.  Watch out for slugs on the new foliage as it emerges in the spring.  

Next month Helen Deighan, who is our communications lead, is going to share with us her list of her top five plants. Don’t forget that any member can submit an article; it can be about your ‘Top Five Plants’ or about any garden related topic – the only criterion is that it is about your garden! Please get in touch with our editor, Anne Butler, at newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net, if you have a possible article or would like to discuss an idea.

MAY 2021 MEETING

This month, on Wednesday 12May, we are delighted to welcome Andy McIndoe into our living rooms for his ZOOM lecture on ‘Beautiful English Gardens: A journey around some classic gardens. Lovely pictures and beautiful flowers’.

With over 40 years-experience in retail and production horticulture, Andy McIndoe is an author and regular contributor to a number of magazines, blogs and BBC Radio. Andy works freelance spending most of his time advising on, designing and planting private gardens of all sizes. His plant knowledge, practical approach and eye for planting combinations are put to good use both in creating gardens from scratch and transforming established gardens. He and his wife Ros welcome visitors by appointment to their 2.5acre naturalistic garden, Sandhill Farm, Hampshire during the spring, summer and autumn. Grayshott Gardeners has an outing planned there for 23 June – we are sure Andy’s enthusiasm will inspire you to want to visit.

This club night lecture is open to all members starting at 8pm, but as always you can log in at 7.30pm for a bit of a chat, before we are all ‘muted’ ready for the lecture.

Further details about logging in can be obtained from Helen Deighan at comms@grayshottgardeners.net, if you are not already registered. Details automatically will be sent to all those members who registered for the previous ZOOM lectures. On the night of the lecture, it will be possible to admit up to 100 people on ZOOM – so first come, first served.

RECORDINGS OF ZOOM LECTURES

Don’t forget that, when possible, we record our lectures too and they are available, after the lecture, for a time limited period if you didn’t have a chance to ZOOM in or you want to listen to it again. You will receive details of the recordings via e-mail from comms@grayshottgardeners.net .

WHAT IS IT? Results for No. 5 & Photo for No. 6

The answer for April 2021 was the floral parts of the Toad Lily, Tricyrtis. Congratulations to member, Karen Cozens (yet again!), who correctly identified the photo.

Photo no. 5:

And here is photo no. 6:

If you think you know what it is, please e-mail Gordon Rae president@grayshottgardeners.net by 15 May 2021.

We will provide the answer and the names of those who correctly identified the photo in our June newsletter.

HELP NEEDED AT THE HUNTER CENTRE

One of our members, Belinda Pope, is a trustee at The Hunter Centre (see more here) in Haslemere. It offers day care for those with dementia and respite for their carers as well as advice and guidance on dementia in general. The trustees are keen to develop the services offered at the Centre and one initiative being progressed is to start catering for people with lower need dementia who are still pretty independent but who would benefit from increased stimulation and social interaction. There is a lovely secure garden behind the Centre which is being developed further and one of the proposals is to start a gardening club for an afternoon a week (Tuesday or Saturday) where clients could come and potter in the garden, tend the tubs and raised beds, plant a few things, weed, deadhead, water, tend seeds etc with a little supervision and assistance if required. We are looking for volunteers to help run the club and wonder if there is anyone in the Grayshott Gardeners who’d have any time and inclination to support this initiative even if not every week. Please contact the secretary at the Hunter Centre if you are able to help or would like more information.

SARAH RAVEN PODCAST

When you’ve spent time in the garden and are enjoying a well-earned cuppa, why not tune in to the podcast

 “grow, cook, eat, arrange”; this is by gardeners Sarah Raven and Arthur Parkinson, who’ve worked together for nearly ten years at the beautiful Perch Hill Farm in the South of England. The link is here.

Sarah loves gardening in general, but growing produce both food and flowers is the part she loves the most. She also loves to cook straight forward garden-picked food every day with the minimal amount of ingredients and palaver but the greatest amount of taste! Arthur is Sarah’s friend and workmate who picks beautiful arrangements for photoshoots and open days at the farm, from buckets of scented sweet peas to huge armfuls of dahlias and towering gladiolus.

PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION – SPRING

Thank you to everyone who submitted photos in our Spring Photographic competition. Entitled “It Looks Like Spring”, the closing date was the end of April and the difficult task of judging is under way. We will put the winning entries on our website here; the winner in first place will be awarded a prize of £20.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Attached is our Grayshott Gardeners themed crossword puzzle for May.

Please look out for the answers in the June newsletter. For those who can’t wait a whole month…or perhaps need a clue, the answers to the crossword will be posted on the website (grayshottgardeners.net or here) on 7th May 2021, in the ‘newsletter’ tab.

Attached to this newsletter are the answers to the April crossword puzzle which featured in our last newsletter. These answers also are on our website: grayshottgardeners.net or here, in the ‘newsletter’ tab.

NEW E-MAIL ADDRESSES FOR GG COMMITTEE MEMBERS

The club has set up new email addresses for some of the GG Committee members, so that we do not have to publish personal email addresses, and to give a consistent approach.

The ones created so far are as follows –:

comms@grayshottgardeners.net                Helen Deighan – communications to members

info@grayshottgardeners.net                        Rosario Henshall – Hon. Secretary 

membership@grayshottgardeners.net Jane Jones – Membership Secretary

newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net Anne Butler – newsletter related items

president@grayshottgardeners.net Gordon Rae – President, potato & photographic competitions

programme@grayshottgardeners.net   Sue Wheeler – Programme Coordinator and the Grayshott Gardeners website

shows@grayshottgardeners.net Pamela Wright – Show Coordinator

treasurer@grayshottgardeners.net Dennis Homer – Hon. Treasurer

You will see these being used, as relevant, on the website, in the programme, on posters, in the newsletter etc.

If you need to communicate with the committee members, please send your email to the appropriate person using the email addresses listed above.

GRAYSHOTT GARDENERS’ TALES

Here is the second tale about Grayshott Gardeners which Gordon Rae, our President, has told.

This may have been related before in Grayshott. It was a special birthday for my wife, Judith. I asked her if there was something special she would like. As she was not able to think of anything, she suggested a surprise.

Being an ‘incurable romantic’, I gave it some serious thought and finally came up with a surprise present. I bought her something she did want – a new garage door!

The following February we went to an R.H.S. Snowdrop Show in London. It was Valentine’s Day and Judith wanted to buy me a named snowdrop as a present for my collection. She found one specially for me. It is called “Grumpy”!

If you have a Grayshott Gardeners Tale you’d like to share, please get in touch with the editor at newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net.

Newsletter April 2021

Grayshott Gardeners Newsletter :

April 2021

FROM THE CHAIR

Welcome to our April newsletter. I hope you are staying safe and have managed to get out in your gardens and enjoy some of the lovely weather.

Unfortunately, we have had to cancel both our April outing to Wisley and our Plant Sale. We will still be selling plants to help generate some funds – this will be at in-person lectures later in the year and our Summer Show on 10th July – which we hope can go ahead. In the meantime, we will sell plants virtually so look out for e-mails with details.

Happy gardening.  Anne Waddell, Chairman

GRAYSHOTT TALES – THE REVEREND JEREMY ‘MALAPROP’, ST LUKE’S CHURCH

(with his agreement and at his expense)

This month, we thought we would start a feature ‘Grayshott Tales’ and this one is from Gordon Rae about our local vicar, Jeremy Haswell. Coincidentally, three of us happened to meet in the churchyard when Jeremy emerged at speed from the vestry. Having exchanged afternoon pleasantries, we told the vicar that we were discussing the fact that the trees in the churchyard came from different parts of the world. “For example,” I said, “that tall one on the boundary with blue grey leaves from Australia”. Keen to proffer his knowledge, even as a self-confessed non-gardener. Jeremy said he knew that one. “That is”, replied the reverend “a Eucharistus tree”. “Very nearly”, we told him. “That is a Eucalyptus, not a Eucharistus tree”. Not a bad guess for a non-horticultural man of God”!

If you have Grayshott Tales you’d like to share, please get in touch with the editor: newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net

WHAT IS IT? Results for No. 4 & Photo for No. 5

The answer for March 2021 was the end of a banana. Congratulations to members Karen Cozens (again!) and Bronwyn Pennington who correctly identified the photo.

Photo no. 4: the end of a banana

And here is photo no. 5

If you think you know what it is, please e-mail Gordon Rae.

We will provide the answer and the names of those who correctly identified the photo in our May newsletter.

OUR TOP FIVE PLANTS – from two GRAYSHOTT GARDENERS

This month we feature the ‘Top 5 Plants’ of our patron and president, Gordon Rae and his wife Judith. Here is what they said:

As Karen Cozens found last month, choosing just five favourite plants is near impossible. We have chosen plants which have done well in Grayshott on our lighter, acidic soil.

  Daphne bholua  Judith has chosen this plant variety ‘Jacqueline Postill’ because of its abundance of purplish pink to white flowers in the bleak month of January. They are highly fragrant and the scent hangs on the still air in the border of our patch of woodland garden. The plant is evergreen, and the flowers are followed by black seeds, which germinate quite easily.  
  Galanthus  The Daphne is followed by a collection of Snowdrops, the true harbinger of spring, although our Snowdrops have a succession of shapes, sizes and markings from November until late March.  
  Camellias    Camellias and Rhododendrons are well suited to the acidic soils of Grayshott. Different species of Camellias will provide us with flowers from early (C. sasanqua) to late (C. transnokoensis) winter and throughout the spring (C. sinensis) in a colour palette ranging from deep red, pink to yellow and the purest of white. Camellias also provide evergreen foliage, but the buds and flowers do suffer from frost and rain damage.  
  Hostas  Judith now has a collection of 60-70 different Hostas growing happily in pots, pans and open borders. The variety of leaf form and colour combinations of green, white, cream and yellow, followed by spikes of blue flowers is infinite and come in any size from miniature to very large like ‘Sum and Substance’ and ‘Big Daddy’.  
  Acers  A large genus of over 100 species, again with a wide variety of size from small shrubs to large Maple trees, with a choice to suit any Grayshott situation. Acers have been chosen for their beautiful crisp, clean and fresh foliage and particularly their spectacular deep red, brown, orange and yellow intense autumn colours. A must for any Grayshott Gardener.  

Next month our Programme Coordinator, Sue Wheeler, is going to share with us her list of her top five plants. Don’t forget that any member can submit an article; it can be about your ‘Top Five Plants’ or about any garden related topic – the only criterion is that it is about your garden! Please get in touch with our editor at newsletter@grayshottgardeners.net, if you have a possible article or would like to discuss an idea

APRIL 2021 MEETING

Our Zoom lectures continue to be very popular. The talk this month on Wednesday 14th April is given by the celebrated Timothy Walker, entitled ‘What Have Plants Ever Done for Us?’. Rarely does a minute go by when we are not involved in an activity that would be impossible without the help of plants. This talk looks at mankind’s dependence on plants for everything from food to film and from painkillers to paint.  It also examines the ways in which our exploitation of plants could keep up with demand from an increasing global population and what we as individuals can do to help future generations.

Timothy Walker is a British botanist. He was the Horti Praefectus of the University of Oxford Botanic Garden and Harcourt Arboretum. From 1977–1980, Timothy studied for a BA degree in Botany at University College, Oxford. From 1980–82, he was a trainee gardener at the Oxford Botanic Garden. From August 2014 he was a stipendiary lecturer in Plant Sciences at Somerville College, Oxford, and now holds similar positions at Pembroke College and Hertford College.

Timothy gives many lectures to groups up and down the country and is obviously very popular and we are very lucky to be able to welcome him into our homes via Zoom.

One quote: “If you haven’t heard him, his lectures are the equivalent of sparkling vintage champagne” Val Bourne (Oxford Times). 

This event is open to all members starting at 8pm but as always you can log in at 7.30pm for a bit of a chat, before we are all ‘muted’ ready for the lecture.

Further details about logging in can be obtained from Helen Deighan if you are not already registered. Details automatically will be sent to all those members who registered for the previous ZOOM lectures. On the night of the lecture, it will be possible to admit up to 100 people on ZOOM – so first come, first served.

RECORDINGS OF ZOOM LECTURES

Don’t forget that, when possible, we record our lectures too and they are available, after the lecture, for a time limited period if you didn’t have a chance to ZOOM in or you want to listen to it again. The recording of the February lecturer, garden designer Amanda Patton, had an amazing 118 hits, (even more than the ‘pig’ lookalike of our ZOOM coordinator John Price!), while there were approximately 70 logins for the live event. You will receive details of the recordings via e-mail – so do watch out for them.

PLANT SALE

Our plant sale which was to take place on 8th May cannot go ahead because of the difficulty of complying with COVID-19 requirements. However, undaunted, we are proceeding to sell plants that we have painstakingly divided and nurtured throughout the winter. Please keep your eyes peeled on your e-mail in-box – and act FAST. The Chrysanthemum Frutescens (marguerite daisy) which our Chairman, Anne, had for sale last month were all snapped up within half an hour!

NO APRIL 2021 GG OUTING

And, sadly, the easing of restrictions roadmap also does not allow us to proceed with our scheduled GG outing to R.H.S. Wisley on 28th April. Watch this space about other GG outings (see your yellow 2021 Handbook) which we hope it will be possible to hold.

PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION – SPRING

As reported in our last newsletter, our Spring Photographic competition is going ahead, even though we regretfully have had to cancel the Spring Show. The title is “It Looks Like Spring”. You are invited to e-mail one photo to Gordon Rae. Judging will be carried out by an external judge. There will be the usual prize of £20 for the winner.

The closing date for the Spring entries has been extended until 30th April 2021.  Please don’t forget that a little humour in the photos will be much appreciated!

HOME REMEDY FOR THE TREATMENT OF BOX MOTH

An article has been spotted on NextDoor Grayshott which may be of help, if your box hedges are suffering from box moth. This is a ‘home remedy’ and an unproven technique to our knowledge, but you may want to give it a try.

With the slices of warm spring weather becoming more frequent, the highly destructive box moths are coming back. They can strip a plant in weeks. Please could you keep a look out and take action if you find any? We really need to act as a neighbourhood on this J. They are fairly easy to pick off by hand, though if you have lots of box, this might not be practical.

Having tried all the more natural remedies, this one seems to work the best:

250ml water

3tsp Neem oil (easy to find on-line)

1tsp lavender or rosemary oil

Squirt washing up liquid or liquid soap

Mix in spray bottle and mist over whole plant, especially around the base. Keep your pets away for a few hours at least. I use it fortnightly or more often if heavy rain. It does smell strong, but works SO well.

DAVID HURRION – NEWSLETTER

One of our popular lecturers, David Hurrion, and well respected in the horticultural world, has a really good website here. You can sign up to receive David’s regular newsletter by going to the form at the bottom right-hand corner of his home page.

And don’t forget our own website here, which is regularly updated.

MONTY DON – WHAT THE AMERICANS SAY ABOUT GARDENERS’ WORLD

Another of Britain’s much-loved gardeners is Monty Don. For years, he has been leading us down all kinds of paths to show us why green spaces are vital to our wellbeing and culture. It seems like the Americans agree too – see this article here from “across the pond” on the British institution that is Gardeners’ World.

Apart from the fact that the dogs are Golden Retrievers (not Labradors), we think it’s a pretty good piece.